Newt Gingrich Was for Billionaire Meddling in Primary Elections Before He Was Against it

Newt Gingrich Was for Billionaire Meddling in Primary Elections Before He Was Against it



newtRobert Stacy McCain has a post up pointing to Newt’s scathing rebuke of Karl Rove’s involvement in the GOP primary process. The key paragraph of Newt’s rant is as follows.

I am unalterably opposed to a bunch of billionaires financing a boss to pick candidates in 50 states. This is the opposite of the Republican tradition of freedom and grassroots small town conservatism.

Long time followers know I’m no fan of Newt Gingrich. Newt Gingrich slept with the enemy and he can never hide that from me. Like Robert Stacy McCain, I too was located in the 23rd congressional district during the special that put Doug Hoffman up against Dede Scozzafava and Bill Owens. As bloggers, we tried everything we could to get the attention of Gingrich to ensure he knew Scozzafava was a liberal running as a Republican. She was a wolf in sheep’s clothing and supporting her was a terrible decision.

Gingrich powered on, though, and pounded his chest while claiming majorities for the party were more important than supporting Doug Hoffman, the conservative who was forced to run third party because Scozzafava’s power brokers worked him off the GOP ticket. Gingrich refused to see the truth and let party politics blind his choices.

But let’s not spend too much time in Newt’s mistakes of 2009. Let’s look at his comments against Rove and remember 2012. Again… from Newt Gingrich.

I am unalterably opposed to a bunch of billionaires financing a boss to pick candidates in 50 states. This is the opposite of the Republican tradition of freedom and grassroots small town conservatism.

My question is simple. Where was Newt Gingrich when it came to Sheldon Adelson, the billionaire who bankrolled Newt’s shot at a primary win in 2012?

Sheldon Adelson plays as stubbornly in politics as he does in business. So the criticisms that he’s trying to personally buy the presidential election for Newt Gingrich are met with a roll of the eyes. “Those people are either jealous or professional critics,” Adelson tells me during his first interview since he andhis wife began funneling $11 million, with another $10 million injection widely expected, into the former speaker’s super PAC, Winning Our Future. “They like to trash other people. It’s unfair that I’ve been treated unfair—but it doesn’t stop me. I might give $10 million or $100 million to Gingrich.”

I’m not defending Karl Rove’s choice of candidates  here. As a libertarian I believe Karl Rove has every right to organize and spend money in primaries in whatever way he sees fit. I also believe Karl Rove needs to remove his mask and let the world see that he seeks to elevate candidates who play the polished, professional, liberal, consultant based game that has destroyed Washington and brought liberty to her knees. But I in no way suggest Rove shouldn’t be allowed to do what he wishes to do. Just as Sheldon Adelson should also be able to organize and spend politically.

But I dislike Newt’s dishonesty here. Yes, Newt may be fantastic on fresh ideas and bold stances. But Newt has also betrayed conservatives in favor of party politics. And here we see Newt trashing big money politics, just a year after his candidacy only survived because of big money politics.

Pot, meet kettle.